PHOTO: Garry Lee
PHOTO: Garry Lee

Wet, wild but not a disaster

THE legacy of ex-tropical cyclone Oswald created plenty of wet weather and blustery winds, leaving 13,000 homes without power, downing trees and delaying the start to school for students at Richmond River High and Woodlawn.

PHOTO: Garry Lee
PHOTO: Garry Lee

 

But with the exception of flooding in North Lismore, which is not protected by a levee, the Richmond Valley was spared the kind of destruction that was rampant throughout coastal Queensland and in the Clarence.

The Wilsons River peaked at 9.43m on Tuesday morning, after a day when forecast models and rescue workers had predicted the rain depression to move away.

In fact, the system stalled and enough rain fell on the southern slopes of the Mt Warning Caldera to fill the Wilsons River catchment.

But overall the Richmond was spared, so the floodplains around Coraki escaped the kind of damage that took place in January 2008, when a large fish kill resulted from de-oxygenated flood water.

"We have a lot of water in the upper Wilsons catchment," Floodplain Services Manager with the Richmond River County Council, Michael Wood said. "But historically water lying on paddocks in the upper catchment does not produce oxygen deficient water as a result of flooding. That's because it gets away too quickly."

The Clarence, meanwhile, is bracing for a severe black water event.

PHOTO: Stephen Nelson
PHOTO: Stephen Nelson

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