All of those beautiful mangoes rotting on the ground!
All of those beautiful mangoes rotting on the ground!

Too many mangoes...

The blenders are whizzing as North Coast residents whip up smoothies and daiquiris, revelling in the biggest mango bonanza in years.

But the bumper crop is causing some problems for Lismore City Council with people throwing their unwanted surplus into their organic wheelie bins.

Last week council had to reject six bins that were overloaded with rotting mangoes, making the bins too heavy to lift and empty into the trucks.

Kevin Trustum, Council’s Waste and Water Education Officer, said “a wheelie bin full of mangoes can weigh over 150 kilograms and there is a limit on household bins of 80 kilograms, which includes the weight of the bin.

“While residents are encouraged to place fallen mangoes in their organics bin so they can be recycled into compost, they need to be careful they do not exceed the bin lifting limits,” he said.

“If their bins are too heavy, they will be rejected and then the resident has the problem of trying to dispose of the waste themselves.”

He suggested asking neighbours if they could borrow space in their organics bins.

Major Jenny Dowell has offered a recipe for mango chutney (see page 23) as a way of dealing with the excess.

The Echo would love to hear from readers with any other mango recipes to deal with the great mango glut of 2010.


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