Lawrence English at the opening of his Rhythm of Protest exhibition at The Lismore Regional Gallery.
Lawrence English at the opening of his Rhythm of Protest exhibition at The Lismore Regional Gallery. Sophie Moeller

The Sound And The Fury

WE'VE all heard of tear gas and water cannons as systems of crowd control but contemporary protest has become increasingly about acoustic domination.

Internationally renowned Brisbane artist, composer and curator, Lawrence English, explores the shifting role sound plays in situations of protest and public assembly in his exhibition, Rhythm of Protest.

The solo exhibition by the Brisbane-based artist is on at The Lismore Regional Gallery until April 7 and will also extend out into The Quad.

Mr English says "listening plays a critical part in how we navigate and understand our environment”.

Got to the full story on the exhibition and how "Sound has the profound ability to haunt, shock and terrify”. subscriber content


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