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Spate of tawnie hits caught in headlights

HOOT: Tawny frogmouths are coming to the attention of WIRES.
HOOT: Tawny frogmouths are coming to the attention of WIRES. Sharon McGrigor

WIRES has rescued two tawny frogmouths per day since May 1, and every single one of them was hit by a car.

Tawnies are mainly nocturnal hunters but may still be active in pre-dawn conditions. They catch much of their prey in flight and are likely swooping after insects illuminated in headlamp beams.

About 6am or 7am at this time of year, more birds than average are on the roads. Morning traffic lights are attracting clouds of insects and the birds are out for the feast. If you are on the road at that time, please be especially alert for birdlife.

Roads with very little street lighting and reasonably dense bushland on either side are also hot spots for incidents between vehicles and other animals.

Each year, hundreds of animals come into WIRES care as a result of motor vehicle incidents in the Northern Rivers. Try to spot wildlife before it's too late. If you do have a collision with an animal, it is important to report it to WIRES as soon as possible. For those that may have a joey in the pouch, early rescue is critical.

If it is difficult or unsafe for you to stop, give as much detail of the location as you can to the WIRES hotline so the rescuer can easily locate the animal. Put the 24-hour hotline number in your phone.

The next WIRES training course is coming up later this month. Contact the 24-hour hotline now to reserve your place - 6628 1898.

Topics:  tawny frogmouth wires northern rivers


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