THINGS are grim if you can't even keep the Boy Scouts on side.

The youth movement has been forced to apologise after US President Donald Trump used a speech to 40,000 of its members to spew political invective.

Chief Scout executive Michael Surbaugh released a statement on Wednesday offering his "sincere apologies" for the President infecting its annual get-together in West Virginia with politics.

"I want to extend my sincere apologies to those in our Scouting family who were offended by the political rhetoric that was inserted into the jamboree," he said.

Chief Scout Executive Michael Surbaugh released a statement apologizing to members of the scouting community who were offended by the aggressive political rhetoric in the president's speech three days earlier.
Chief Scout Executive Michael Surbaugh released a statement apologizing to members of the scouting community who were offended by the aggressive political rhetoric in the president's speech three days earlier. AP Photo - Carolyn Kaster

"That was never our intent. The invitation for the sitting US President to visit the National Jamboree is a longstanding tradition that has been extended to the leader of our nation that has had a Jamboree during his term since 1937.

"It is in no way an endorsement of any person, party or policies.

"For years, people have called upon us to take a position on political issues, and we have steadfastly remained nonpartisan and refused to comment on political matters.

President DonaldTrump, front left, gestures as former boys scouts, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, left, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, watch at the 2017 National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Summit in Glen Jean,W. Va., Monday, July 24, 2017.
President DonaldTrump, front left, gestures as former boys scouts, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, left, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, watch at the 2017 National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Summit in Glen Jean,W. Va., Monday, July 24, 2017. AP Photo - Steve Helber

"We sincerely regret that politics were inserted into the Scouting program."

The President angered many parents when he referred to "fake news" and the Washington "sewer" during a speech on Monday.

"In fact, today I said we ought to change it from the word 'swamp' to the word 'cesspool' or perhaps to the word 'sewer'. It's not good. I see what's going on and believe me, I'd much rather be with you, that I can tell you," he told the boys, who were there for outdoor activities and to develop their leadership skills.

President Donald Trump waves to the crowd of scouts at the 2017 National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Summit in Glen Jean,W. Va., Monday, July 24, 2017.
President Donald Trump waves to the crowd of scouts at the 2017 National Boy Scout Jamboree at the Summit in Glen Jean,W. Va., Monday, July 24, 2017. AP Photo - Steve Helber

In discussing healthcare, he goaded the audience into booing former president Barack Obama.

Many parents took to the Scouts' Facebook page to say they were taking their children out of the organisation.

Jude Nevans wrote that she was "done with Scouts" after "you felt the need to have my kid listen to a liar stroke his ego on our time".

Other parents said the Scouts should have vetted the speech beforehand to ensure it was appropriate for the audience.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Mr Trump's speech was well-received by the audience.

"I was at that event and I saw nothing but roughly 40,000-45,000 Boy Scouts cheering the President on throughout his remarks and I think they were pretty excited that he was there and happy to hear him speak to them," she told reporters during the Thursday White House press briefing.

News Corp Australia

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