ANXIOUS WAIT: Hazara refugee Nadir Sadiqi.
ANXIOUS WAIT: Hazara refugee Nadir Sadiqi.

Taliban death threats linger in Coast refugee's wait

NADIR Sadiqi's time is up.

Today he is supposed to be boarding a jet plane on a no-return ticket to his former homeland in Afghanistan.

And here, not longer after his arrival, the Hazara refugee believes he will meet his death at the hands of the Taliban.

But Mr Sadiqi won't be boarding a plane today.

The Sunshine Coast refugee group Buddies and his Brisbane lawyers continue to fight with the Immigration Department for him to stay in Australia.

Buddies' Terry Boyce said they were still no clearer on Mr Sadiqi's future than they were when the Daily first highlighted his plight on June 20.

Since then, Mr Sadiqi has appeared on national television and newspapers throughout the country.

"He was anxious before, he is terrified now," Mr Boyce said.

"His visa expires today, he is in greater danger. He could be taken out of the community and thrown into a detention centre in far flung area like the Northern Territory where we can't reach him."

Hazara refugee Nadir Sadiqi who arrived in Australia on a boat in 2011 has been told to return to Kabul by August 6. Photo Patrick Woods / Sunshine Coast Daily
Hazara refugee Nadir Sadiqi who arrived in Australia on a boat in 2011 has been told to return to Kabul by August 6. Photo Patrick Woods / Sunshine Coast Daily Patrick Woods

While the Immigration Department has attempted to reassure Mr Sadiqi this won't happen, he can't rest at ease until he has received confirmation in black-and-white from Minister Peter Dutton that he can stay.

Late yesterday an Immigration and Border Protection spokesman again said he could remain, for now.

"The Department will not detain and initiate removal processes whilst this individual has ongoing matters before the Department," a spokesman said.

Mr Boyce said an appeal was being heard in the High Court on another refugee matter in Western Australia on August 7 which may have bearing on this case.

"The government, as we see it, is tightening the noose and tightening control it is just getting worse.

"They don't want to create a precedent in Mr Sadiqi's case. But there are very few refugees in Australia who have Mr Sadiqi's circumstances with family members killed and him bashed as well.

"It is a political ideology. The Department is trying to say 'don't worry, you won't have to go'.

"But that could change in a flash. We don't trust the department."


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