Rebel Wilson: My ancestors were criminals

Rebel Wilson
Rebel Wilson Bang Showbiz

REBEL Wilson suspects some of her ancestors were "convicts".

The 29-year-old actress revealed her ancestors were taken from Ireland to Australia - where she was born - because they were "criminals".

She said: "Some of my heritage is Irish so I would love to film there, maybe not in the winter. Being from Australia I am not used to the cold.

>> Rebel Wilson talks about her fashion 'responsibility' to fans

"They were convicts, criminals basically. Bad Irish people that were sent to Australia ... I have the fair Irish skin that always reminds me of my heritage."

Rebel said she has a deep-rooted love of the country and would like to make a film there one day in the future.

She told RTÉ TEN: "My favourite playwright Martin McDonagh is Irish and he now writes films - I would love to work in Ireland and get my Irish accent on. Or a different accent but film there because it is so beautiful. Whenever I see Ireland on screen it looks amazing."

Meanwhile, Rebel also revealed she spent five weeks training for a 40-second movie stunt in her new film 'Pitch Perfect 2'.

The Australian actress - who stars alongside Anna Kendrick and Brittany Snow in the new musical comedy - has revealed she put herself through weeks of training for a brief on-screen stunt.

She explained: "In 'Pitch Perfect 2' I do my own aerial stunts. I trained for five weeks, for only a 40-second stunt routine!

"I needed the training let's put it that way. I don't have any natural acrobatic gymnastic skills."

Topics:  ancestry rebel wilson

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