Education Minister Peter Garrett says the 2012 NAPLAN results show that more needs to be done for disadvantaged students.
Education Minister Peter Garrett says the 2012 NAPLAN results show that more needs to be done for disadvantaged students. Danielle Lowe

NAPLAN stats show students need to start reading more

MOST school students' performance in reading during this year's NAPLAN test fell marginally across all age groups in Queensland and New South Wales.

The performance in reading of all age groups also again fell, in line with how far those children lived from the capital cities.

An analysis of the NAPLAN data showed students in provincial, remote and very remote areas of both states performed consistently worse than their city counterparts.

School Education Minister Peter Garrett said the results told the government more needed to be done, but too many disadvantaged students were left behind.

"Coming a week after the disappointing results in the latest international tests in reading, science and maths, taken in late 2010, the report shows we have made improvements in some areas but there is still a lot of work ahead," he said.

"Today's report also confirmed that that a student's results are still too closely linked to their parents' education.

"Almost 98% of students of parents or carers with a bachelor's degree achieved the minimum standards, compared to 84.5% of those with parents who have achieved only Year 11 standard."

Mr Garrett said the full detailed results also emphasised the need for all state and territory governments to work with the Federal Government to help deliver the goal of being in the top five countries for school education in the world by 2025.

"There are problems and room for improvement in every state, and in every school sector, and we need to work together to get the best results for our children," he said.

About 93.8% of Year Three students in Queensland's metropolitan areas performed at or above national standards in 2012.

The rate in the sunshine state fell significantly in line with remoteness, to just 71.4% in very remote areas of the state.

In NSW, 95.5% of Year Three students in metropolitan areas performed at or above national standards in 2012.
But that rate fell to 83.8% in remote area, down to 79.8% in very remote areas of the state.

Similar rates were found across all age groups for reading skills, with at least 90% of all metropolitan students performing at or above the national standard.

Again, the performance of all groups in reading fell in line with remoteness, down to a just 68.6% of Year Seven reading students in very remote areas of Queensland up to national standards.

But among the decline reading standards in both Queensland and NSW, there were some improvements.

The performance of NSW Year Three students for reading in very remote areas rose from 76.5% in 2011, to 79.8% in 2012.

Queensland's Year Five students in metropolitan and provincial areas also performed slightly better in reading this year than in 2011, up 0.4% and 1% respectively.

Reading performance of Year Seven students in remote areas of NSW also did better this year, up 3.1% between 2011 and 2012 - to 83.1% in 2012.

The national NAPLAN report and more information can be found at www.nap.edu.au.

 

NAPLAN  reading results

NSW
Metropolitan: 92.5% to 95.5%
Provincial: 90.7% to 93.4%
Remote: 67.9% to 83.8%
Very Remote: 69.6% to 79.8%


QLD
Metropolitan: 90.7% to 94.3%
Provincial: 87.7% to 92.5%
Remote: 75.8% to 85.8%
Very Remote: 56.8% to 71.4%


* SOURCE: National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy results by geolocation; reading results at or above national standard, 2012.

 

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