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Mystery of MasterChef's popularity explained

Sarah Hudson(head chef) from Sea Salt Italian Ristorante.
Sarah Hudson(head chef) from Sea Salt Italian Ristorante. Blainey Woodham

TWEED chefs are baffled as to why MasterChef is so popular, but are happy to see food in the spotlight.

The new TV series MasterChef: The Professionals features chefs from around Australia battling it out under the guidance of celebrity chef Marco Pierre White.

With over 1.3 million people tuning in to watch the first episode of the show ratings are through the roof and evidently food and cooking is more popular than ever in Australia

Sea Salt Italian Ristorante head chef Sarah Hudson couldn't put her finger on why people were so captivated by the TV series.

"It's crazy," she said. It's just cooking at the end of the day.

"It's food, it's always going to be around."

"But people are more interested in what happens back of house."

Ms Hudson had noticed more people asking their chefs questions as Sea Salt restaurant had an open kitchen.

"They'll come home and try it and usually they'll come back because they couldn't do it.

"We don't give out recipes but we're happy to provide the dish again," she laughed.

Ms Hudson said that while she liked the new series of MasterChef, the show didn't always portray the full picture.

"It's not easy, it's hard," she said.

"Even once you're off an apprenticeship the money is a lot better but the hours are pretty bad."

However, she encouraged young chefs to keep at it and avoid being distracted by the supposed glamour and fame of cooking.

"If you stick to it and do what you want you'll get to it," she said.

"Chefs will always have work because people need to eat."

Ms Hudson thought that the show was doing the industry a favour, and encouraging people to dine out and appreciate food.

However, some local chefs we talked to found the show so distasteful they chose not to comment.

Topics:  masterchef masterchef the professionals


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