Eta Carina Nebula, estimated to be between 6,500 and 10,000 light years from Earth, captured by astro-photographer Michael Worthington.
Eta Carina Nebula, estimated to be between 6,500 and 10,000 light years from Earth, captured by astro-photographer Michael Worthington.

Look up, up in the sky...

ASTRO-PHOTOGRAPHER Michael Worthington is preparing his equipment to capture a major meteorite shower in our skies.

The Rosebank collector of deep-space photos is getting ready for this weekend, when a yearly meteor shower activity will peak.

Mr Worthington explained that the best time to watch the phenomena this year will be from 11pm on Saturday, August 11, until 4:30am on Sunday, August 12.

"The best way to see the meteors will be moving away from any city light, possibly to an elevated position or somewhere where you can see the horizon from."

The meteor shower is called The Perseids as they are normally visible around the Perseus Constellation in the sky.

He added that The Perseids "will be visible looking towards the North West and meteors will be moving South".

The meteors are debris and fragments the size of a grain of sand that were once part of the comet Swift-Tuttle.

Every year, the Earth crosses the line of debris left behind by the Swift-Tuttle and those tiny particles, most of them over 1000 years-old, are burned by our atmosphere and they become meteorites.

The Perseids have been observed by humans for about 2000 years, with the earliest knowledge of their existence emerging from the Far East.


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