Babies aren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and are more susceptible to heat-related illnesses.
Babies aren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and are more susceptible to heat-related illnesses. Tony Martin

Save bubs by keeping them cool as summer temps soar

WITH much of Queensland already experiencing high temperatures, parents and caregivers are being reminded to keep babies and young children cool to avoid heat-related illness.

Queensland chief health officer Jeannette Young said babies and children weren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and they were more susceptible to heat-related illnesses.

"Children have a lower capacity to sweat, which reduces their ability to lose body heat by evaporation," Dr Young said.

"Babies and young children are completely dependent on adults to supply their essential needs, so it's important for adults to monitor their child's condition during periods of hot weather and take precautionary measures."

Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) acting commissioner David Eeles said there were a number of preventative measures parents and caregivers could take to ensure babies and young children were protected from heat-related illnesses.

"Give children plenty of water before they become thirsty, avoid the use of ice and drinks that cause dehydration," Mr Eeles said.


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