News

Is having two jobs for one family selfish?

One parent should be home with the kids, says an Apple Tree Creek woman.
One parent should be home with the kids, says an Apple Tree Creek woman. Anatoliy Samara

RETIRED registered nurse Judy Petschulies has come up with a radical plan to fix Bundaberg's unemployment epidemic.

Mrs Petschulies created a stir on social media this week when she said double-income households were placing others at a disadvantage when, if they learnt to live within their means, could survive on a single income, thus freeing up jobs for others.

Her revelations angered many, but Mrs Petschulies stands behind her words.

"I am a 75-year-old woman, well educated. I have travelled and have a broad outlook on life," she said.

"What I was trying to say is that with the terrible unemployment figures that Bundaberg has, with some families having no one working at all, I feel it is unfair that there are families who have two members working.

"By two family members working, this takes away jobs from some of those who have no work at all."

The Apple Tree Creek resident said she was also against government handouts for expectant mums in the form of paid parental leave and childcare rebates.

"This money would be better spent in trying to alleviate the shortage of work," she said.

"I believe if you have children you should look after them yourself and not expect any handouts from anyone.

"If you cannot afford to have them, you don't have them."

Mrs Petschulies said it did not matter who in the household went to work, "as long as one is working and there is one there minding the children".

"Otherwise you have other people imposing their ideas on to your kids," she said.

"Are they being kind to them? Who knows. You'd like to think so, but none of us ever really know."

Mrs Petschulies said the problem was more far reaching than unemployment, with community groups unable to find volunteers as women headed to work.

"One Bundaberg high school with over 1000 students has been struggling to get a P&C committee - no one has any time to help out. I know one of their recent presidents was a single mum with no work while all these mums with paid work don't have any time, yet they expect their children to benefit from all the hard work these volunteers do. It's just not fair," she said.

Despite the backlash, "those with two working went ballistic and would not even think of the idea", Mrs Petschulies said she hoped she had given people something to think about and maybe touched a few nerves.

"If everyone was prepared to share around a little of their knowledge, their ideas and to help those less fortunate than ourselves, it would be a better world," she said.

"It worries me that people are really only thinking about themselves and not others as well."

Born in 1942, living off post-war rations with little money and toys, Mrs Petschulies said she had fond childhood memories to look back on in a family that loved one another.

"(We) had no electricity, so none of the mod-cons ... to now computers. Huge changes in that time," she said.

She was married at 22 and had two children. The family struggled to make ends meet, but made do without the luxuries.

Her husband then landed a job in the Pilbara and the family relocated.

Mrs Petschulies remembers the feeling of isolation that came with living in a mining town thousands of miles from family in Queensland where the climate was harsh, but says they made it through and the struggle pulled them closer together.

"Many people could not live there and left after only a few months. So you have to make sacrifices to succeed," she said.

She also said when the couple married in 1965 jobs were plentiful and often there were not enough workers to fill the positions. A stark contrast to today.

In the end, Mrs Petschulies said she just wanted people to consider their peers and give others a fair go.

Topics:  editors picks employments jobs


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Make the most of extra hour to move your body

Lismore Echo Health & Fitness Guru Roberta O'brien.

Extra hour in the morning will give you more spring in your step

How to get your Splendour tickets, locals only

Crowd at Splendour in the Grass 2016.  Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star

Are you a resident in the area allowed to purchase them?

Local Partners

How to get your Splendour tickets, locals only

FIND out who can get them and what do you need to prepare before you buy them.

MOVIE REVIEW: LEGO Batman best caped crusader yet

A scene from the movie The Lego Batman Movie.

Nana! Nana! Nana! Nana! Nana! Batman!

Future Islands gear up for Splendour gig

Future Islands is an American synthpop band composed of Gerrit Welmers (keyboards and programming), William Cashion (bass, acoustic and electric guitars), and Samuel T. Herring (lyrics and vocals).

Their new album is "music from the heart than from the mind".

MOVIE REVIEW: Power Rangers way out of their league

Becky G., Dacre Montgomery, Naomi Scott, Ludi Lin, and RJ Cyler in a scene from the movie Power Rangers.

A Lego action figure is capable of running rings around teen misfits

Bliss N Eso announce a stack of regional tour dates

Aussie rappers Bliss N Eso are hitting the road in May for a 27-date national tour.

AUSSIE rappers hitting the road in May with new album.

Scarlett Johansson reveals the huge roles she’s lost out on

Scarlett Johansson greets fans at the Japan World Premiere of the movie Ghost In The Shell.

GHOST in the Shell star shares ups and downs of Hollywood.

MOVIE REVIEW: Life puts Alien’s Ridley Scott on notice

Rebecca Ferguson in a scene from the movie Life.

RYAN Reynolds, Rebecca Ferguson star in epic sci-fi thriller.

Luxury hotel expands $400m water park development

Developer to push on with second stage of massive new water park

Dalwood waterfall up for sale

Two people have died at Dalwood Falls, Ballina.

How would you like to own your very own waterfall?

Couple ditch Springfield for $350 million rural lifestyle

Sales consultant Rachel Hargreaves (left) of Oliver Hume Waterlea at Wallon with new land owner Rebecca Mallett.

“To purchase a block the same size would be double the price here"

It's official: Byron Bay unaffordable

MILLIONAIRES ROW: The Housing Commission house in Keats St, Byron Bay which sold at auction on Saturday for $1.65 million.

Buying a home in Bay Bay is a dream too far for some

Coast home luring interstate buyers sold

PRIZED POSITION: Blue clip location, peaceful surroundings, spacious living with swimming pool, tennis court on 4562sq
m

The property was described as a 'Queenslander with Hamptons style'

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!