Trooper Stuart James Reddan.
Trooper Stuart James Reddan.

Full military honours in farewell for Coast soldier

TROOPER Stuart James Reddan's love for the army became evident when he was three years old in day care.

The young fella, whose great uncle Sir Thomas William Glasgow, was a war hero, led the day care in the national anthem.

Stuart died when he was struck by a tree in a training exercise at Shoalwater Bay on May 4.

He was in the service of the Light Horse Regiment, doing what he loved.

Hundreds packed the Buderim Gregson and Weight chapel yesterday to say goodbye to a popular kid, who excelled in whatever he put his mind to, from his love of music to his dedication in the army.

 

Hundreds packed the Gregson and Weight Buderim funeral home to say goodbye to Trooper Stuart Reddan.
Hundreds packed the Gregson and Weight Buderim funeral home to say goodbye to Trooper Stuart Reddan. John McCutcheon

Stuart's family, mum and dad, Laura and Brad, and sister and brother, Erin and Tom, issued a short statement to "honour the life of Stuart".

"He touched so many lives with his kind, happy disposition," it read.

"We would like to thank everyone for your thoughts and support at this difficult time, especially his Australian Defence Force Family.

"He was so proud to serve his country."

Stuart was farewelled with full military honours.

The funeral procession was led by a riderless horse with stirrups reversed, which is a symbol of respect and mourning for fallen members of Light Horse unit.

 

A riderless horse, with stirrups reversed led the procession.
A riderless horse, with stirrups reversed led the procession. John McCutcheon

Members of the 2/14 Light Horse Regiment marched behind the horse.

Stuart's coffin followed behind, transported on a gun carriage while the Royal Australian Band played the "Death March".

The Australian Light Armoured Vehicle (ASLAV) brought up the rear of the procession. Stuart was part of the mounted unit which used armoured tanks and personal carriers.

And then, once the service was over, Stuart's coffin adorned with poppies placed on it by people attending the service was taken back down the street as a firing party commenced a volley.

 

Trooper Stuart Reddan's coffin followed by an armoured vehicle go towards the funeral service.
Trooper Stuart Reddan's coffin followed by an armoured vehicle go towards the funeral service. John McCutcheon

Rod Schafferius, who officiated the service shared snippets of Stuart's too short life, which lived to the full.

"Stuart bounced into the world on January 9, 1996. From babyhood he was happy and kind kid with lots of energy."

Stuart's musical passion saw him playing for two years in a row in the Jim Morrison band and he was selected to join young conservatory program in Brisbane.

But he was always headed for the army and was awarded best non-commissioning officer in 2011 and best soldier in 2012.

"Moments before Stuart was taken from us, he was experiencing life to the fullest," Mr Schafferius said.

"Adrenaline was fuelling his body, he as shoulder to shoulder with his army brothers."

Stuart's Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Moss fought back tears as he shared what an "outstanding solider" Stuart was.

"He was selfless hard-working and professional. He was the type of guy you want next to you in your armoured uniform."

 


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