FRESH: Raw food expert Liz GilbertGrant offered tips, advice and some recipes at her latest talk in Lismore.Photo by Suzannah Lack
FRESH: Raw food expert Liz GilbertGrant offered tips, advice and some recipes at her latest talk in Lismore.Photo by Suzannah Lack

Food in the raw

TWO zucchinis shredded to look like pasta, two cups of raw cashew nuts to emulate seafood, plus some diced tomatoes, parsley, mint and red capsicum.

And there is your lunch: raw spaghetti marinara.

Liz GilbertGrant is not a trained cook, because strictly speaking, she never cooks.

She is a raw food advocate, and she met some raw food enthusiasts at a demonstration at Lismore Library this week.

The audience was treated to some raw chocolate (cocoa, carob and spices), young coconut juice and other live foods.

The raw food movement advocates eating food not heated over 45 degrees Celsius, as enzymes present in raw food are killed if exposed to temperatures higher than 45 degrees.

 

Mrs GilbertGrant was asked by The Echo about the suitability of the raw food lifestyle for children.

"The most natural approach is the best with children. They are able to tell you what their bodies ask them for easily, they are not as conditioned to addictions as we adults are".

The raw food advocate acknowledged that she does not follow recipes, and that is why every meal is different, based on the ingredients she has around.

She denounced foods that are deceptive on their labelling.

"Some food labels claim they are raw but they are not. Look at raw sugar, for instance, it is not raw, it is just brown."


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