Experts say often foods less healthy than you may think

Lee Constable

QUICK and easy is not always healthy when it comes to grabbing a bite to eat.

Mater Misericordiae Hospital dietitian and diabetes educator Fiona Lynch said a lot of people in Mackay were making poor nutrition choices, which increased their chance of developing deadly chronic diseases such as heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

"People make the mistake of not planning ahead," Ms Lynch said.

"There are a lot of foods out there that people think are healthy, but they're really quite bad.

Foods like muesli bars were bad and even foods marketed as low-fat, like diet bars, were a treat, she said.

"People think low-fat is a smart choice, but (it's) not always."

The latest information from Nutrition Australia Queensland suggests that only 4% of people can tell the difference between healthy and unhealthy food.

And many foods, such as Caesar salads, frozen yoghurts and breakfast cereals, while marketed as healthy foods, actually contained high amounts of sugar, fat and salt.

"If they don't buy healthy ingredients and prepare, people will tend to go for the unhealthy option," Ms Lynch said.

"Read the food labels of what you're eating and make a clear choice.

"It's a really worrying statistics that if we keep going the way that we are, there won't be enough health professionals to deal with the future number of unhealthy people.

The closer your food was from the paddock to the plate, the better, she said.

Topics:  diabetes food health nutrition

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