FUTURE CROC KEBAB: Lyndell Janetzki, from Wodonga in Victoria, at the Koorana Crocodile Farm.
FUTURE CROC KEBAB: Lyndell Janetzki, from Wodonga in Victoria, at the Koorana Crocodile Farm. Chris Ison Rokccroc

Tourists love seeing, holding and especially eating crocs

JOHN Lever and the team at the Koorana Crocodile Farm have been "flat stick" over the Christmas and New Year period.

Visitors have been flooding to the popular Rockhampton tourist destination, defying the recent heatwave for the chance to get up close to the giant reptiles.

"So far it has been outstanding," John said, during some rare downtime.

"Compared to other years, we are probably ahead at the moment.

"We have had many days of between 100 and 200 people. I was surprised that so many came out when it was so hot."

The restaurant has also been running hot, with 15 to 30 lunches served every day.

About 95% of patrons were choosing to eat crocodile, which is served as steak, kebabs, pies, ribs or burgers.

John said those who visited the farm last Monday were "privileged" to see an egg collection.

They were laid by one of 25 young females that had been moved to the enclosure previously inhabited by Pinjara, the 50-year-old croc that was relocated to the Melbourne Aquarium in September last year.


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