MAKE IT HAPPEN: Nathan Eyers and Katie O’Rourke invite the community to visit the Pozible.com website and donate to help make a documentary about the local Back Alley Gallery project.
MAKE IT HAPPEN: Nathan Eyers and Katie O’Rourke invite the community to visit the Pozible.com website and donate to help make a documentary about the local Back Alley Gallery project.

Colourful walls on silver screen

With street art looking down from every wall, the Back Alley Gallery was the venue for one of the most colourful and lively stages at this year's lantern parade festivities - full of live hip-hop music and a crowd of bouncing, happy people. In case you haven't seen it yet, Eggins Lane, which is situated off Carrington St, was transformed last year from a space with blank, dull brick walls into a lively work of art, thanks to the Back Alley Gallery project creator, Nathan Eyers.

Nathan and all of the artists who collaborated to make the gallery a reality have embarked on a campaign to raise enough money to make a documentary about the project, and they need your help. They have already made a trailer for the movie, but in order to see it become a short film suitable for film festivals and cinemas, they need to raise another $2500.

"We are using an online platform called Pozible, which is an online crowd sourcing tool and people are encouraged to visit the website and pledge some money," Nathan said. "Every dollar adds to the total and we'd like to see enough money raised for the film before we throw a street party with art demonstrations in the Back Alley Gallery on August 25 and 26."

Nathan said initially a documentary wasn't on the horizon, but it seemed to make sense after people seemed so interested in photographing and filming their progress.

"If this documentary happens, it will benefit the artists because they will have a document of their part in this project and it's a great way to bring the world into what is happening in Lismore. The whole project has been 100% owned and created by locals, but it has gained so much respect that now international artists want to get involved, and that's a real compliment to Lismore."

As a street artist who loves his work, Nathan said the gallery was an important place where people could come to express themselves and know their art would remain for a long time.

"In other places, people might create a piece and it will be tagged over in a couple of days," Nathan said. "Whether you get tagged or not comes down to your profile as an artist and what you have done for the graffiti community."

Lismore City Centre manager Katie O'Rourke said she was looking into sourcing corporate sponsorship to help fund the project, but public pledges of support were crucial for the documentary to be able to go ahead.

"Each person who donates over $20 will get to have a piece of the Back Alley Gallery in some form, and know that they have contributed to the film themselves. It is a great way for the community to support and engage with this fantastic project that adds colour and vibrancy to Lismore and revitalises the city centre."

For more information about the project, visit facebook.com/back alleygallery and to pledge money, visit pozible.com/ thebackalleygallery (where you can also see the trailer).


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