The Burger King Nighmare King burger Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope
The Burger King Nighmare King burger Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope

Halloween burger that actually gives you nightmares

BURGER King claims its Halloween burger will literally give you nightmares - if that's what you're after.

The fast food chain undertook a bizarre study for its latest gimmick - the Nightmare King - in an attempt to prove the legitimacy of 'cheese dreams'.

The spooky burger with a sesame green bun has a beef patty, a chicken fillet, American cheese, bacon, creamy mayonnaise and onions - which is a line up that's likely to be nightmare inducing for the health conscious already.

But Burger King claims eating the Nightmare King (which is being sold in US stores) will make it 3.5 times more likely for you to sleep terribly when you hit the pillow.

The fast food outlet is the parent company of Hungry Jacks, which is what it is known as in Australia.

Burger King’s Halloween burger is claimed to be able to give the eater real nightmares. Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope
Burger King’s Halloween burger is claimed to be able to give the eater real nightmares. Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope

 

Burger King say they teamed up with the Paramount Trials, Florida Sleep and Neuro Diagnostic Services to conduct a study of 100 participants (victims) who were monitored over ten nights, who ate the Nightmare King before they went to bed.

"By tracking various signals from the sleeping subjects including their heart rate, brain activity and breath, a group of doctors and scientists identified whether the individuals had vivid dreams," A Burger King spokesman said.

Participant's nightmares included someone turning into a snake and aliens attacking a boat they were a passenger on.

 

The burger brand conducted a scientific study over 10 nights with 100 participants who ate the Nightmare King before they went to bed. Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope
The burger brand conducted a scientific study over 10 nights with 100 participants who ate the Nightmare King before they went to bed. Picture: Burger King/ Austral Scope

 

Dr Medina claimed it was a combination of proteins and cheese in the Nightmare King that led to "an interruption of the subjects' REM (Rapid Eye Movement) cycles, during which we experience the majority of our dreams."

The idea that cheese can give you nightmares has been around for years, and there have been multiple attempts to prove whether or not this is true but there's no solid evidence that says it does.

It has been proven that eating heavy meals with a high fat content late at night can give you disturbed sleep - but whether that equates to disturbing dreams has yet to be proven.

A BBC report noted it was common practice in some countries to have cheese as the last course in a heavy meal, which could be why cheese is linked to nightmares.

There is a rare phenomenon known as a "cheese reaction" - which has linked a class of antidepressants (monoamine oxidase B inhibitors) to an unusual side effect which prevents the breakdown of the substance tyramine, which naturally occurs in cheese.


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