Residents are being urged to deliver sick and injured birds to their local veterinary clinic while wildlife groups try to work out what’s causing the epidemic.
Residents are being urged to deliver sick and injured birds to their local veterinary clinic while wildlife groups try to work out what’s causing the epidemic.

Rumours fuel mystery bird epidemic

RUMOURS and theories have been circulating on social media an in attempt to explain the high volume of sick and dying rainbow lorikeets around Australia.

Clarence Valley WIRES carer Robyn Gray said she and many other volunteers had been overwhelmed by the sheer number of birds coming into care.

"My first bird came in around the beginning of the year and it hasn't stopped," she said.

"One volunteer picked up 18 lorikeets from the vet yesterday."

Ms Gray said the problem had become so serious that Taronga Zoo, the University of Sydney and Currumbin Wildlife Hospital had jumped on board to investigate.

It's understood over 300 birds have arrived to Currumbin Wildlife Hospital in the past week.

"It's going to be a while before we can get answers," she said.

"But in the meantime, we're asking the general public that if they come across a sick or injured bird, to drop them off at any of the vet clinics and they will contact us."


Your top 100 coronavirus questions answered

Your top 100 coronavirus questions answered

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented situation and it’s understandable that...

‘Police will intervene’: those not following health warnings

premium_icon ‘Police will intervene’: those not following health warnings

POLICE are asking people to listen to the health warnings and help reduce the...

How will COVID-19 impact Lismore ratepayers?

premium_icon How will COVID-19 impact Lismore ratepayers?

LISMORE City Council will work to alleviate any financial pressure ratepayers will...