The sticker that someone attached to baby products in the store. Kidspot has blacked out the website so they don't get more publicity. Picture: supplied.
The sticker that someone attached to baby products in the store. Kidspot has blacked out the website so they don't get more publicity. Picture: supplied.

Anti-vaxxers target baby products in Aussie stores

A NSW mum shopping at Big W with her baby daughter today made an unpleasant discovery in the baby section.

Anti-vaccination material typed out on stickers had been attached to several products.

The mum tells Kidspot she was really angry when she found it and noted that there were other stickers scrunched up on the floor in the same aisle.

To be clear, the stickers have nothing to do with Big W or any other retailer who may have been targeted by the anti-vaxxers, these are guerilla marketing tactics used to try to target vulnerable new parents who may not yet have vaccinated their babies.  It's a tactic that has been used before. Last year a mother in WA bought a tin of formula for her baby daughter and when she opened it she found a propaganda card from the same organisation.

Pro-vaccine campaigner Catherine Hughes, whose son Riley died of whooping cough at four weeks of age in 2015, told the Daily Telegraph last year when the card was found that it was a new low for the anti-vax movement.

"I think it speaks volumes they have to sink to such a low level, it's disgraceful and if you were a new parent, it could influence your decision to vaccinate. Fear is a tactic they like to use, but it's also breach of safety that they can go into a Woolworth's store and tamper with formula, it's concerning on many levels," she said.

Unsurprisingly, the fear-based cards and stickers are not based on fact and do not cite any sources.

  • Multiple studies have been conducted investigating whether there is any link between immunisation and SIDS and no evidence has been found to support the theory that the two are linked.  Some studies have even confirmed the SUDI rate in the immunised group is nearly half that in the non-immunised group. You can find more information including links to those studies at Red Nose.
  • The theory that vaccines could cause autism has been debunked, over, and over and over. 
  • Despite some falsified research (that has since been withdrawn) that claimed that the HPV vaccine caused cancer, the truth is cancer researchers have found the exact opposite, vaccines prevent many cancers that are caused by viruses.
  • Well-performed studies show no increase in allergy or asthma due to use of routine childhood vaccines. Although asthma and allergic disease rates have increased in the past few decades, the reason for this remains unknown. Vaccination can help protect children with asthma from the severe reactions they could have to vaccine-preventable disease.

You can learn more about the importance of vaccinating your child at The Immunisation Foundation of Australia

This originally appeared on Kidspot and has been republished with permission.

News Corp Australia

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