Colour in and help save a threatened species

This colourful platypus painted by Angus Emerson of Uki Public School won a highly commended in the Dymocks Golden Paw Awards last year. Primary school kids are now being urged to enter the 2006 comp.

Australia holds a sad world record for species extinction, but its not too late to help save endangered animals. In NSW alone 765 species are threatened, and many of them live in the Northern Rivers area including the regent honeyeater, the yellow-bellied glider and the freckled duck.

To help keep these species alive Dymocks and the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) have launched the Golden Paw Awards, a colouring competition for primary school students.

The younger children become aware of conservation the more likely they are to grow up and become environmentally conscious adults, said Carmen Welss from the NPWS. Kids have a natural affinity with animals, and are the best ambassadors wildlife can have.

Now in its fifth year, the awards give students and schools the chance to win great prizes and the first 50 schools to enter will receive a DVD called Creative Drawing with Einstein. The focus this year is on aquatic animals and Dymocks will donate $1 for every entry received towards a marine mammal rescue van for the North Coast.

The top 600 drawings will be displayed at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Entry forms can be downloaded from www.fnpw.org.au or drop in to Dymocks in Molesworth Street, Lismore.

Entries must be received by September 7, a day chosen in memory of Benjamin (the last Tasmanian Tiger) who died on that day in 1936 in Hobart Zoo.


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