Walking on the edge

Art should be at the forefront of human thinking. It reflects to the viewer where we are as a society. And as an individual.

This has been the role of art over the millennia - to confront, to challenge, to inform. And to do it with a harmony and grace that beguiles us.

Sometimes art tells truths that some may not want to hear. Art (and the artist) may suffer censorship (or worse) as a consequence. But truth and art are entwined and are especially valuable when times are turbulent.

Dervis Pavlovics exhibition Walking the Tightrope, now on display at the Next Art Gallery in Goodman Plaza at the Southern Cross University in Lismore, confronts with its political acuity and delights with its crafted beauty.

Born in Germany and having studied art in Sydney, Dervis uses his mastery of the medium (oil on canvas) to amplify the personal; to describe the social; to highlight the universal.

These paintings are large in physical size and scope.

Walking the Tightrope runs till March 16. The gallery is open from 10am-4pm, Monday to Friday.


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