A population of the critically endangered boggomoss snail near the Nathan Dam project was found to be “significantly higher than originally suggested”. Picture: John Stanisic
A population of the critically endangered boggomoss snail near the Nathan Dam project was found to be “significantly higher than originally suggested”. Picture: John Stanisic

$1.2b dam granted federal approval after nine years

A $1.2 billion dam is back from the dead after a population of endangered snails caused the vital Queensland project to be shelved nine years ago.

More than 500 construction jobs were lost in 2008 when the boggomoss snail - listed as critically endangered - was discovered at the Nathan Dam project site along the Dawson River, west of Gladstone.

 

An artists impression of the proposed Nathan Dam
Photo Contributed
An artists impression of the proposed Nathan Dam Photo Contributed Contributed

Independent experts have since found the population of the snail to be "significantly higher than originally suggested" and the project is officially back on the table.

But the struggle at a snail's pace to get the project off the ground has drawn criticism as the boggomoss snail joins the yakka skink, the ornamental snake, the Wallum tree frog and the black-throated finch as endangered species that have caused significant delays to big projects.

Queensland Resources Council chief executive Ian Macfarlane welcomed the approval of the project, but questioned why the process took so long.

 

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